HEADLINES

Kluge Center Welcomes New 2020 Scholars

The John W. Kluge Center is pleased to announce several new scholars who have arrived or will arrive in residence in 2020.

Hal Brands will hold the Henry A. Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations beginning in July and will continue through December.

Brands is the Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. He is the author or co-author of several books on U.S. foreign policy, including “The Lessons of Tragedy” (2019) and “American Grand Strategy in the Age of Trump” (2018). At the Kluge Center, he will be working on a project titled “How to Wage a Twilight Struggle: Lessons from America’s Cold War.”

Carla Freeman holds the Library of Congress Chair in U.S.-China Relations. She began her residency in January and will continue through September.

Freeman is the executive director of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies Foreign Policy Institute, as well as an associate research professor in China studies at the School of Advanced International Studies. She is editor-in-chief of the academic journal “Asian Perspective,” published by Johns Hopkins University Press. Freeman is working on a book project looking at the significant role played by the concept of containment in China’s foreign policy discourse.

Patricia O’Toole is a Distinguished Visiting Scholar. She began her residency in January and will continue through April.

O’Toole is a former professor in the School of the Arts at Columbia University and a fellow of the Society of American Historians. She is the author of five books, including acclaimed biographies of Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Adams, and the most recent, “The Moralist: Woodrow Wilson and the World He Made” (2018). O’Toole is working on a book project focusing on Roosevelt’s efforts to give the United States a social safety net.

Kenneth Pomeranz holds the Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the North. He began his residency in January and will continue through July.

Pomeranz is a University Professor of History at the University of Chicago. He is the author of “The Great Divergence: China, Europe, and the Making of the Modern World Economy” (2000), which won the John K. Fairbank Prize from the American Historical Association. He is working on a book called “Why Is China So Big?” which tries to explain, from various perspectives, how and why contemporary China’s huge land mass and population have come to form a single political unit.

Ignacio M. Sánchez Prado will hold the Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South beginning in May and continuing through August.

Sánchez Prado is the Jarvis Thurston and Mona van Duyn Professor in the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis, where he is a member of the faculty in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and the Latin American studies program. He is the author of several books including the most recent, “Intermitencias alfonsinas. Estudios y otros textos” (2019). He will be working on a project titled “Cosmopolitanism from Below: Mexican Cinema, the World and Globalization.”

Jacqueline Najuma Stewart will hold the Kluge Chair in Modern Culture beginning in June and continuing through September.

Stewart is a professor in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies and director of Arts + Public Life at the University of Chicago. She is the author of “Migrating to the Movies: Cinema and Black Urban Modernity” (2005) and co-author of “L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema” (2015). She will be working on a project examining how the Library of Congress has come to amass one of the largest collections of African American film in the world and how the collection has been preserved, described and used to narrate the history of black cinema.

Sophia Jordán Wallace will hold the Library of Congress Chair in Congressional Policymaking beginning in May and continuing through July.

Jordán Wallace is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington in Seattle and director of the Washington Institute for the Study of Inequality and Race. Her forthcoming co-authored book, "Walls, Cages, and Family Separation: Immigration in the Trump Era" (2020), examines public opinion towards contemporary immigration policies. She is working on a book project looking at negotiations between members of Congress on immigration bills, the conditions under which agreement on immigration legislation has been reached in the past, and what coalitions might make passage possible in the future.

The Kluge Center’s mission, as established in 2000, is to reinvigorate the interconnection between thought and action, bridging the gap between scholarship and policymaking. To that end, the center brings some of the world’s great thinkers to the Library to make use of the Library collections and engage in conversations addressing the challenges facing democracies in the 21st century.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States — and extensive materials from around the world — both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Subscribe

Follow Brewster HamletHub