HEADLINES

Giving Tuesday 2021 is November 30th

#GivingTuesday was created in 2012 by the team at the Belfer Center for Innovation & Social Impact at the 92nd Street Y, a cultural and community center in New York City.

Directly following Black Friday and Cyber Monday each year, Giving Tuesday harnesses the power of social media to connect and encourage people around the world to give back to their communities during the holiday season. Givers are invited to take action however they feel inspired to -- through donations, volunteering, advocacy, acts of kindness and more. Anyone can be a part of Giving Tuesday, including families, individuals, companies and organizations.

To further celebrate and encourage giving, the movement asks participants to share their stories or ideas on social media using the hashtag #GivingTuesday, bringing together a community of givers from around the world.

This year, Giving Tuesday 2021 is on November 30.

Each year, the movement inspires people to take action on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. 

Before you donate this Giving Tuesday ― and anytime you’re asked to give to charity:
  • Research the cause or the organizationSearch online for the name of the organization or cause with words like “review,” “scam,” or “complaint.” See if others have had good or bad experiences with the charity. Check out what charity watchdog groups say about that organization.
  • Know that it’s ok to ask questions. If the request for a donation is over the phone, the caller should be able to answer critical questions. For example, how much of your donation will go to the program you want to help? Is the caller raising funds for a charity or for a Political Action Committee (PAC)? (Donations to PACs are NOT tax deductible.)
  • Slow down. You don’t have to give over the phone, and anybody who pressures you might be someone you want to avoid giving to.
  • Know who’s making the request. Don’t assume a request to donate is legitimate because a friend posted it on social media. Your friend might not personally know the charity or how it spends money. When you do your own research, double-check the exact name of the organization. Scammers will pick names or use website addresses that sound very similar to legitimate well-known charities.

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